February 16, 2014

I can totally see this

doctorwho:

browsethestacks:

ed-pool:

What if Doctor Who was an American show?

(via BuzzFeed)

<OMG>

¡¡¡Best Post Ever!!!

'What if Doctor Who was an American Show' fan casting.

(via ifc)

February 12, 2014
Time Warner Cable might be the worst run company in America.  Good riddance
breakingnews:

Reports: Comcast to buy Time Warner Cable
CNBC, Reuters and The Wall Street Journal reportthat Comcast and Time Warner Cable have agreed to merge in a $45 billion deal, according to sources. 
The official announcement is expected Thursday morning, CNBC reports. 
Follow updates on Breaking News. 
Photo: A cable truck returns to a Time Warner Cable office in San Diego, Calif., on Dec.11, 2013. (Mike Blake / Reuters)

Time Warner Cable might be the worst run company in America.  Good riddance

breakingnews:

Reports: Comcast to buy Time Warner Cable

CNBC, Reuters and The Wall Street Journal reportthat Comcast and Time Warner Cable have agreed to merge in a $45 billion deal, according to sources. 

The official announcement is expected Thursday morning, CNBC reports. 

Follow updates on Breaking News

Photo: A cable truck returns to a Time Warner Cable office in San Diego, Calif., on Dec.11, 2013. (Mike Blake / Reuters)

January 31, 2014

theatlantic:

Felix Baumgartner’s Disorienting and Amazing Fall from Space

On a Saturday in October 2012, the Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner stepped off a helium balloon and plummeted—with his parachute—to Earth. He simultaneously broke the world records for highest manned balloon flight, highest parachute jump, and fastest free fall velocity.

I remember the jump well. For the hour before Baumgartner leapt—and the minutes he was in the air—my Twitter and Facebook friends were captivated. Afternoon plans were canceled as we watched the live feed, enthralled.

As enthralling as the live feed was, it’s nothing compared to the video above. It turns out Baumgartner was wearing GoPro cameras on his jump, and they captured the entire fall… in astonishing detail… from a first-person view.

It is insane.

Read more.

January 31, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Stop The Western Australia Shark Cull

In response to a handful of fatal shark bites over the past several years, the government of Western Australia has launched a multi-million dollar effort to systematically catch and kill sharks, allegedly to “protect the people of Western Australia”. This is in direct opposition to Australia’s existing Shark Recovery Plan. I guess when you call something a “cull” it’s supposed to sound more acceptable than “indiscriminate killing of a keystone ocean species.”

Today I join with thousands around the world (what up, Ricky Gervais?) to say that this must stop. This is not supported by science. Hundreds of marine biologists agree.

More than 100 million sharks are killed per year, for food and fear, pushing many of them, like the great white, to the brink of extinction. Meanwhile, you could count the number of fatal shark attacks every year on one hand.

You have a 1 in 3,700,000 chance of dying from a shark biting you. In contrast, you have a 1 in 63 chance of dying from the flu. Shark bites are a rare event, and fatal ones are astronomically rare. Sharks don’t actually attack humans, this is an invented term that implies that sharks are out to get people. They are not. “Rogue sharks,” those that specifically seek out humans for food, are a myth. Sharks are apex predators who keep ecosystems healthy and keep food webs in balance, all the way down to the plant level.

Instead of killing sharks, we should be using this money to study them, to track their behavior and migrations, or even to install automatic alert and surveillance systems. 

See that photo above, under mine? That’s the WA cull’s first victim, a tiger shark, being dispatched this week. The cull is wrong on many levels, but it took four shots with that .22 to kill the shark, and that is adding greater inhumanity to an inhumane act. 

Join me in calling for an end to the Western Australia shark cull. Download the #noWAsharkcull sign here, add your face to the thousands protesting this cull, and tag your photos with #nosharkcull and #noWAsharkcull.

You can find more information on shark conservation at Support Our Sharks and there’s a petition in place on Change.org

We can make a difference!

January 31, 2014

Please click on this and check it out everyone.  Sad and disturbing

jtotheizzoe:

This obnoxiously long infographic is your reminder to check out this post from earlier today and join me in calling for a stop to the inhumane and unscientific Western Australia shark cull (not to mention shark finning in general, which is an even greater problem)!!

January 24, 2014

huffingtonpost:

If a deer farts on the Internet, do you hear it?
http://huff.to/1fcKGYT


Oh my  #deer !

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/50fn

January 6, 2014

theatlantic:

What the World Looks Like (When You’re a Crab Net)

This is how one marine explorer summed up the ecosystem that has established itself below the ocean’s surface: “Darling, it’s better down where it’s wetter, take it from me.”

We have generally taken his word for it.

Thanks to an enterprising videographer, though, we can test Sebastian’s claim for ourselves. In late December, Scott Murray had a crazy idea: to attach a GoPro camera to a crab net—and see, vicariously, what the net saw. And what the net saw is pretty amazing: crabs, clawing over food. Rays. Fish, in glittering schools. A FREAKING DOLPHIN.

Read more.

December 31, 2013

jtotheizzoe:

Science Magazine picks their Scientific Breakthroughs of the Year for 2013, from growing miniature organs to the big/small world of the human microbiome to transparent brains.

My favorite from the list? CRISPRs, a genetic engineering tool that might change the way we study and manipulate genetics.

Did your favorite scientific breakthrough of the year make the list?

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

December 31, 2013
13 Moments from 2013 That Remind Us Why Baseball Is Wonderful: Part I

I love baseball.  is it springtime yet?

oldtimefamilybaseball:

Now that you’ve eaten all the pie that a human being can safely consume, and as you prepare to drink all of the celebratory champagne to ring in 2014, it’s time to look back at 2013, and the year that was. 

Because baseball, while merely diversion, is also a sublime one, celebrating those who overcoming failure, bringing cities together, and  providing a lot of really hilarious gifs along the way. 

So what were the 13 most wonderful moments in 2013? Continue on: 

13. Munenori Kawasaki Makes Us All Fall in Love

Coming into the year, Munenori Kawasaki was already well regarded among utility infielder enthusiasts and dancing critics. His dugout performances with the Seattle Mariners are among the greatest of theatrical displays, his fluid motion and sense of rhythm surely impressing Nigel Lythgoe, judge of Dancing With the Stars. 

Of course, dancing is not new for Kawasaki, he’s been doing it his whole career

But this year, when Kawasaki went to the Great White North (but actually south from Seattle to Toronto…which just makes my head want to explode), he made us fall in love all over again. Which is a great tagline to the sequel to any romantic comedy. 

On May 26th, against the Baltimore Orioles, Kawasaki hit a walk-off double in the 9th inning to win the game, his smile wide and arms raised as he raced around the bases. But he saved his best moment for the post game interview. 

After Mark DeRosa gives up the mic, Munenori Kawasaki steps forward and, his handy notebook at the ready, announced to the crowd, “I am Japaneeeese!” before thanking the team for giving him the opportunity to drive in those runs. (Click here for the video if the embed doesn’t work) 

Unfortunately for the soft-hitting Kawasaki, perennially at the back-end of the roster, no matter how likable he is or how much he boosts clubhouse chemistry, he still had to be sent on a mid-season trip to AAA. Kawasaki took that in stride as well, saying

"It’s not as if I’ve died. I’m still a baseball player; it’s just that tomorrow the field will be different."

Fortunately for all of us, Kawasaki signed a minor league contract with the Blue Jays for next season, so we should expect to see his face on a big league field for at least a couple of weeks. And we will wait for the good things to come of it, eventually necessitating a sequel to the Illustrated Adventures of…

image

12. Wladimir Balentien Destroys the NPB Home Run Record

Read More

December 24, 2013
sagansense:


Gene Expression Changes With Meditation
With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body.
A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.
The study investigated the effects of a day of intensive mindfulness practice in a group of experienced meditators, compared to a group of untrained control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities. After eight hours of mindfulness practice, the meditators showed a range of genetic and molecular differences, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which in turn correlated with faster physical recovery from a stressful situation.
"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows rapid alterations in gene expression within subjects associated with mindfulness meditation practice," says study author Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds and the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
"Most interestingly, the changes were observed in genes that are the current targets of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs," says Perla Kaliman, first author of the article and a researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research of Barcelona, Spain (IIBB-CSIC-IDIBAPS), where the molecular analyses were conducted.
The study was published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.
Mindfulness-based trainings have shown beneficial effects on inflammatory disorders in prior clinical studies and are endorsed by the American Heart Association as a preventative intervention. The new results provide a possible biological mechanism for therapeutic effects.
The results show a down-regulation of genes that have been implicated in inflammation. The affected genes include the pro-inflammatory genes RIPK2 and COX2 as well as several histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes, which regulate the activity of other genes epigenetically by removing a type of chemical tag. What’s more, the extent to which some of those genes were downregulated was associated with faster cortisol recovery to a social stress test involving an impromptu speech and tasks requiring mental calculations performed in front of an audience and video camera.
Perhaps surprisingly, the researchers say, there was no difference in the tested genes between the two groups of people at the start of the study. The observed effects were seen only in the meditators following mindfulness practice. In addition, several other DNA-modifying genes showed no differences between groups, suggesting that the mindfulness practice specifically affected certain regulatory pathways.
However, it is important to note that the study was not designed to distinguish any effects of long-term meditation training from those of a single day of practice. Instead, the key result is that meditators experienced genetic changes following mindfulness practice that were not seen in the non-meditating group after other quiet activities — an outcome providing proof of principle that mindfulness practice can lead to epigenetic alterations of the genome.
Previous studies in rodents and in people have shown dynamic epigenetic responses to physical stimuli such as stress, diet, or exercise within just a few hours.
"Our genes are quite dynamic in their expression and these results suggest that the calmness of our mind can actually have a potential influence on their expression," Davidson says.
"The regulation of HDACs and inflammatory pathways may represent some of the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic potential of mindfulness-based interventions," Kaliman says. "Our findings set the foundation for future studies to further assess meditation strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions."

via neurosciencestuff

sagansense:

Gene Expression Changes With Meditation

With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body.

A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.

The study investigated the effects of a day of intensive mindfulness practice in a group of experienced meditators, compared to a group of untrained control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities. After eight hours of mindfulness practice, the meditators showed a range of genetic and molecular differences, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which in turn correlated with faster physical recovery from a stressful situation.

"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows rapid alterations in gene expression within subjects associated with mindfulness meditation practice," says study author Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds and the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

"Most interestingly, the changes were observed in genes that are the current targets of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs," says Perla Kaliman, first author of the article and a researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research of Barcelona, Spain (IIBB-CSIC-IDIBAPS), where the molecular analyses were conducted.

The study was published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Mindfulness-based trainings have shown beneficial effects on inflammatory disorders in prior clinical studies and are endorsed by the American Heart Association as a preventative intervention. The new results provide a possible biological mechanism for therapeutic effects.

The results show a down-regulation of genes that have been implicated in inflammation. The affected genes include the pro-inflammatory genes RIPK2 and COX2 as well as several histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes, which regulate the activity of other genes epigenetically by removing a type of chemical tag. What’s more, the extent to which some of those genes were downregulated was associated with faster cortisol recovery to a social stress test involving an impromptu speech and tasks requiring mental calculations performed in front of an audience and video camera.

Perhaps surprisingly, the researchers say, there was no difference in the tested genes between the two groups of people at the start of the study. The observed effects were seen only in the meditators following mindfulness practice. In addition, several other DNA-modifying genes showed no differences between groups, suggesting that the mindfulness practice specifically affected certain regulatory pathways.

However, it is important to note that the study was not designed to distinguish any effects of long-term meditation training from those of a single day of practice. Instead, the key result is that meditators experienced genetic changes following mindfulness practice that were not seen in the non-meditating group after other quiet activities — an outcome providing proof of principle that mindfulness practice can lead to epigenetic alterations of the genome.

Previous studies in rodents and in people have shown dynamic epigenetic responses to physical stimuli such as stress, diet, or exercise within just a few hours.

"Our genes are quite dynamic in their expression and these results suggest that the calmness of our mind can actually have a potential influence on their expression," Davidson says.

"The regulation of HDACs and inflammatory pathways may represent some of the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic potential of mindfulness-based interventions," Kaliman says. "Our findings set the foundation for future studies to further assess meditation strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions."

via neurosciencestuff

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

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